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Name of Collaboratory :

 

Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG)

 
 

Logo :

   
 
 

URL :

  http://www.functionalglycomics.org/static/consortium/consortium.shtml  
 

Collaboratory Status :

 
Operational   Start Date : 2001 End Date : Info Last Updated : Sun, Oct 31 2010 10:01am PDT
 
 

Primary Collaboratory Function :

  Distributed Research Center  
 

Secondary Collaboratory Functions :

  Community Data Systems, Community Infrastructure Development  
 

Domain(s) :

  Cell biology, chemistry, biophysics, genomics, bioinformatics and genetics
 
 

Brief Description of the Collaboratory :

 

The Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) is a large research initiative funded by NIGMS to define the paradigms by which protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate cell communication. The CFG works with the scientific community to create unique resources and services that Participating Investigators can use in their own research. These resources and services, which are provided free of charge by the CFG's Scientific Cores, include glycan array screening, gene microarray screening, mouse phenotyping, glycan profiling, a reagent bank, and data analysis tools. Resulting data sets are integrated and made accessible to the community via the CFG's central database. The CFG also has publicly accessible specialty databases that offer detailed information on glycan-binding proteins, glycan structures, and glycosyltransferases. The number of investigators using CFG resources in their work continues to grow, as reflected by the rate of new publications involving CFG resources. Their vision is to harness the combined research power of their Participating Investigators and their Scientific Cores to achieve their goals.

The Consortium for Functional Glycomics is comprised of three major components: the Steering Committee, the Cores (an Administrative Core and seven Scientific Cores), and the Participating Investigators. Each major component of the CFG interacts directly with the other two.

The Steering Committee consists of 13 members who meet every two weeks. It sets the scientific direction and budget of the CFG, and ensures that information and resources generated by the program are disseminated efficiently within the Consortium and to the public. It also approves priorities and milestones for each of the Scientific Cores, with substantial input from the Cores and Participating Investigators.

The Scientific Cores generate material resources, new technologies, and a platform of information that enable progress toward the overall goal. These resources and services are distributed to other Scientific Cores and Participating Investigators for use in experiments that address the Specific Aims of the CFG.

Bioinformatics Core (B)
Analytical Core (C)
Glycan Synthesis Core (D)
Gene Microarray Core (E)
Mouse Phenotype Core (G)
Protein-Glycan Interaction Core (H)

The third component of the CFG is comprised of the Participating Investigators, each of whom has a program of funded research within the scope of the Consortium. In return for resources, Participating Investigators agree to accept responsibility for addressing one or more Specific Aims and to submit the resulting data to the CFG database. The CFG currently has more than 500 Participating Investigators. Several Participating Investigators have Bridging Grants from the CFG that bridge their research to the goals of the Consortium.

Participating Investigators are divided into Subgroups based on the relevance of their research to the GBP families that are the focus of the CFG. These subgroups foster communication and collaboration among investigators working on common problems, and aid the CFG in identifying priorities to help accelerate progress in the relevant sub-fields.


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The Consortium for Functional Glycomics was established by NIH (NIGHMS) as a Glue-Grant, and anticipates spending a projected total of $34 million on the project over the course of five years.

The overarching goal of the Consortium is to define paradigms by which protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate cell communication.

Three major components comprise the Consortium for Functional Glycomics: the Steering Committee, the Cores (an Administrative Core and seven Scientific Cores), and the Participating Investigators. The Steering Committee consists of 11 members that meet every other week. It has overall responsibility for setting the scientific direction and the budget of the Consortium, and ensuring that information and materials generated by the program are efficiently disseminated within the program and to the public.

Six of the seven Scientific Cores generate material resources, new technologies, and a platform of information that enable progress toward the overall goals. The Information and Bioinformatics Core is responsible for the creation of databases that serve as a window to all program information, and specialized tools that facilitate a glycomics approach to the goals of the Consortium. The reliance of the Consortium on the Cores for achieving the overall goals is underscored by the fact that nearly 90% of the total 'glue grant' funds are allocated to them: Information and Bioinformatics Core; Analytical Core; Carbohydrate Synthesis/Protein Expression Core; Gene Microarray Core; Mouse Transgenics Core; Mouse Phenotype Core; Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction Core

Each Core has a Coordinator (also a member of the Steering Committee) who is responsible for its oversight. The day-to-day operations of each Core are the responsibility of a Core Director. Core Directors are key to the success of the Cores and they attend Steering Committee meetings as deemed appropriate. The participation of the Coordinator and Director of each Core in Steering Committee meetings facilitates the communication of relevant decisions to Core personnel.

The third 'arm' of the Consortium is the Participating Investigators, each of whom has a program of funded research within the scope of the Consortium. In return for resources, Participating Investigators agree to accept responsibility for achieving one or more Specific Aims and to provide the data to the Consortium database. The Consortium currently has 76 Participating Investigators at some 60 institutions. Four Participating Investigators have modest size 'bridging grants' that bridge their research to the goals of the Consortium.

Investigators interested in joining the Consortium as a Participating Investigator are encouraged to fill out an application posted on the Consortium website. The philosophy of the Consortium is to be inclusive, and all qualified investigators are accepted as members. The Participating Investigators are divided into subgroups based on the relevance of their research to the GBP families that are the focus of the Consortium. These subgroups bring together, and facilitate communication among, investigators working on common problems, and aid the Consortium in identifying priorities for helping that sub-field accelerate progress.

A variety of resources and services are available and are distributed to the Scientific Cores and to Participating Investigators for the purpose of conducting experiments that address the Specific Aims of the Consortium. The majority of the resources are being generated by three Scientific Cores, the Carbohydrate Synthesis/Protein Expression Core, the Mouse Transgenics Core, and the Gene Microarray Core. Participating Investigators may also submit experimental samples for analysis by the Gene Microarray Core or the Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction Core.

Information generated by the Cores and by Participating Investigators using program resources will be posted in databases maintained by the Information & Bioinformatics Core (B). All participants of the program will be able to monitor up-to-date progress for any GBP by visiting the Consortium website and viewing posted data.

The Steering Committee sets priorities and milestones for each of the scientific Cores with substantial input from the Cores and Participating Investigators. Resources produced by the scientific Cores are made available to Participating Investigators to perform experiments that will address Specific Aims for one or more GBPs. The Scientific Cores are themselves strengthened by their interaction with the Participating Investigators who provide expertise or technology or both.

 
 

Access to Instruments :

   
 

Access to Information Resources :

  The public dissemination of plans and results is accomplished in multiple ways. The most visible is through the CFG website. The site currently provides a wealth of general information about the purpose of the CFG, its policies for dissemination of information and resources, its progress, and its future plans. From this site, investigators can also join the CFG and access resources.

The Central Database is the most important repository of detailed program information and data from experiments conducted using CFG resources. Users can access this information the search function on the home page, which also links to the CFG's specialty databases, public databases, and the Functional Glycomics Update. Raw data and summary data from the four CFG Cores that produce data are accessible through user-friendly interfaces. Databases can also be accessed by clicking the 'CFG Data' and 'CFG Databases' buttons on the home page.

The CFG also disseminates plans and results via several other routes, including its annual meeting for Participating Investigators, which is open to members of the scientific community who wish to attend and is held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Society for Glycobiology. In addition, CFG results are widely published in journals, and the CFG publishes a quarterly newsletter, The Consortium Quarterly, that is sent by email to Participating Investigators and posted on the program website. The CFG also hosts booths, presents posters and platform talks, distributes flyers at scientific meetings and workshops, and directs public interest to the CFG by placing links in external websites and advertisements for resources in journals.


******PREVIOUSLY******

Bioinformatics database;
Resources are produced by core labs and used by other core labs and participating investigators - high troughput science.
These resources include:
1. Mouse Genetics Core - produce KnockOut Mice, mRNA, and tissues; obtain nothing.
2. Gene MicroArray Core - produce gene microArrays; and obtain mRNA.
3. Carbohydrate Synth. Protein Core - produce oligosaccharides, glycoarrays, CBP Antibodies, glycosiltransferances; obtain nothing.
4. Participating investigators - produce glycoprotien ligands, mRNA's, CHO mutant cell lines, and CBP antibodies; and obtain KnockOut Mice, CBP antibodies, oligosaccharides, gene microarrays, glycosiltransferances, glycoarrays, and CHO mutant cell lines.
5. Mouse Phenotype Core - produce nothing; obtain KnockOut mice, tissues, CBP antibodies, oligosaccharides.
6. Protein Carb. Interaction Core - produce nothing; obtain oligosaccharides, CBP antibodies, and glycoarrays.
7. Analytical Core - produce nothing; obtain tissues, glycoprotein ligands and oligosaccharides
 
 

Access to People as Resources :

   
 

Funding Agency or Sponsor :

 
Glycominds Ltd
Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd.
United States Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Neose Technologies, Inc.
 
 
 

Notes on Funding Agencies/Sponsors:

 
 
 
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS:
 

Notes on Participants/Organizations:

   
     
 
 

Communications Technology Used :

  VCON w/MCU
email
phone
newsletters
information/data repository
website
 
 

Technical Capabilities :

   
  Key Articles :    
 

Project-reported performance data :

   
  Images of the Collaboratory:  
organization of consortium
management structure of consortium
bioinformatics database structure
three arms of the consortium
 
 
         
    
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