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Name of Collaboratory :

 

Arts and Humanities e-Science Support Center (AHeSSC)

 
 

URL :

  http://www.ahessc.ac.uk/  
 

Collaboratory Status :

 
Operational   Start Date : 2004 End Date : Info Last Updated : Thu, Dec 2 2010 5:00pm PST
 
 

Primary Collaboratory Function :

  Distributed Research Center  
 

Secondary Collaboratory Functions :

  Virtual Learning Community  
 

Domain(s) :

  HUMANITIES >Other Humanities >Humanities, General, HUMANITIES >Other Humanities >Humanities, Other
e-Humanities, e-Science in the Humanities
 
 

Brief Description of the Collaboratory :

 

The Arts and Humanities e-Science Support Centre (AHeSSC) exists to support, co-ordinate and promote e-Science in all arts and humanities disciplines.

Conventionally, e-science is a broad term encompassing grid technologies, distributed and high performance computing, and the e-Infrastructure needed by 'big science'. The arts and humanities are faced with ever greater volumes of complex data and digital resources. There is therefore significant potential for the application of e-science tools and methods in these domains. In order to exploit this potential, the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has established AHeSSC to provide information and support to the academic community about 'Arts and Humanities e-Science'.

AHeSSC is a project of the Centre for e-Research at King's College London.

AHeSSC services include:

* Practical assistance and liaison to bring together arts and humanities researchers who wish to use grid infrastructure, tools, and technologies with the e-Science infrastructure.
* Advisory and training activities in support of e-Science in the arts and humanities.
* Outreach activities to promote e-Science within the arts and humanities academic community.
* Facilitation of interdisciplinary work and the exchange of expertise.
* Supporting projects funded under the AHRC/JISC Arts and Humanities e-Science Initiative.

 
 

Access to Instruments :

  Grid technologies are most associated with the large-scale international and international e-infrastructure on which the original concept of 'e-science' was based. When the Arts and Humanities e-science Initiative began in 2005, the grid was concieved of in three forms:

Most importantly, the tools for large-scale data management and sharing provided by data grid technology will be a vital means of meeting the present grand challenge to A&H e-science: how to locate, access and integrate the content of resources that embrace text, still and moving images and sound, are highly distributed, of variable quality, encoded and described using different standards, and often incomplete, fuzzy, and complex

The advanced video-conferencing facilities provided by the access grid will become increasingly important with the spread of collaborative research in the A&H, partly under the impact of the AHRC’s research grant schemes, and in particular provide exciting opportunities for sharing performance and creative interaction in the arts

The sharing of processing power through the computational grid may only occasionally be relevant to the A&H, but there are some exciting potential uses
 
 

Access to Information Resources :

  AHeSSC seeks to provide a point of contact between the current base of early adopters, and the broader arts and humanities research community. This is achieved through disseminating the outcomes of the Initiative's research projects and maintaining the Arts and Humanities e-Science Community portal.  
 

Access to People as Resources :

  AHeSSC seeks to provide a point of contact between the current base of early adopters, and the broader arts and humanities research community. This is achieved through disseminating the outcomes of the Initiative's research projects and maintaining the Arts and Humanities e-Science Community portal.

The group provided an induction to Arts and Humanities e-Science as part of the ‘All Hands’ meeting for the A&H e-Science Initiative projects in May 2008.

Their workshops and workgroups have generally been in the round-table ‘expert seminar’ format. These have ranged from the relatively practical and application-oriented, to the very speculative. These have been a crucial part of their community building activities, and have provided fora for arts and humanities researchers and computer scientists to interact in a way that is rarely possible. So far these have included:

Enhancing and Exploring Epigraphic and Archaeological Data through
e-Science
Living texts: interdisciplinary approaches and methodological commonalities in biology and textual analysis
Space and time: methods in geospatial computing for mapping the past
 
 

Funding Agency or Sponsor :

 
JISC
King's College, London
 
 
 

Notes on Funding Agencies/Sponsors:

 
 
 
Organizations with Funded Participants:
 
Organization name:
Approx # of participants:
Description of organization's role(s):
King's College, London
   Centre for e-Research (CeRch)
4
Project Staff
 
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS:
 

Notes on Participants/Organizations:
AHeSSC supports a number of collaborative e-Science/Humanities projects, each involving one or more institutions.

   
     
 
 

Communications Technology Used :

  AHeSSC staff publish and present extensively on the subject of A&H e-Science. A key part of their outreach strategy is the A&H e-Science Theme at the e-Science Institute.  
 

Technical Capabilities :

   
  Key Articles :    
 

Project-reported performance data :

   
 
         
    
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