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Name of Collaboratory :

 

Birds in Forested Landscapes

 
 

URL :

  http://www.birds.cornell.edu/bfl/  
 

Collaboratory Status :

 
Completed   Start Date : 1996 End Date : 2004 Info Last Updated : Fri, Dec 3 2010 5:00pm PST
 
 

Primary Collaboratory Function :

  Open Community Contribution System  
 

Secondary Collaboratory Functions :

   
 

Domain(s) :

  BIOLOGICAL/AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES >Biological Sciences >Zoology, Other  
 

Brief Description of the Collaboratory :

 

Birds in Forested Landscapes addresses the habitat and conservation needs of forest-dwelling birds throughout North America. BFL was started in 1997 and evolved from the highly successful Project Tanager, one of three National Science Experiments conducted by the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. BFL has broadened the basic Project Tanager protocol to answer questions about other species of forest-dwelling birds and the influences that habitat changes may have on their populations. BFL focuses on gaps in scientific knowledge regarding the specific habitat requirements of high-priority forest birds. Collecting the information necessary to fill these gaps is daunting. The task can be accomplished, however, by harnessing the energy and skills of birders and amateur scientists continentwide.

The work of BFL participants helps answer the following conservation questions:

• How much habitat do different forest-dwelling bird species require for successful breeding?

• How are habitat requirements affected by land uses in the surrounding landscape, such as human development, forestry, and agriculture?

• How do the habitat requirements of a species vary across its range?

BFL engages volunteer birders, land managers, and professional biologists in a study of North America's forest birds. The success of BFL depends on volunteers across the continent who can collect the appropriate data on a massive scale, something a small team of professional researchers could never accomplish. Project participants not only contribute to our knowledge of forest birds, but also become part of a network of experienced volunteer researchers who may be called upon to address other important ornithological questions.

BFL originally focused on seven species of forest thrushes and two accipiters: the Cooper's Hawk and the Sharp-shinned Hawk. Today, BFL is viewed as a proven research tool to study almost any forest bird species and a myriad of characteristics associated with forest habitats.

Based on the data collected from this project, they were able to make several recommendations to the USDA Forest Service for campground management.

 
 

Access to Instruments :

   
 

Access to Information Resources :

  Participants receive:

Accessto all online materials necessary to complete the project

A CD with songs, calls, and other sounds of the BFL study species for field use.

Access to BFL-L, a private e-mail discussion group where project participants can communicate with one another, ask questions, and compare results.

A subscription to Birdscope, a quarterly newsletter reporting the latest findings in research and conservation from the Lab's programs and citizen-science projects.
 
 

Access to People as Resources :

  Participants receive access to BFL-L, a private e-mail discussion group where project participants can communicate with one another, ask questions, and compare results.  
 

Funding Agency or Sponsor :

 
Archie W. and Grace Berry Foundation
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
David and Lucile Packard Foundation
Florence and John Schumann Foundation
National Fish and Wildlife Federation
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service
 
 
 

Notes on Funding Agencies/Sponsors:

 
 
 
Organizations with Funded Participants:
 
Organization name:
Approx # of participants:
Description of organization's role(s):
Cornell University
   Cornell Lab of Ornithology
5
 
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS:
 

Notes on Participants/Organizations:
In 2000, they had 76 volunteer participants; in 2001 120 volunteer participants; and in 2002 76 volunteer participants.

   
     
 
 

Communications Technology Used :

  E-mail, discussion groups, online Web forms.  
 

Technical Capabilities :

   
  Key Articles :    
 

Project-reported performance data :

  In 2000, they had 76 volunteer participants; in 2001 120 volunteer participants; and in 2002 76 volunteer participants.

Data were collected and returned to CLO from a total of 26 National Forests for the breeding seasons of 2000, 2001, and 2002. Participating forests were located in seven western and two eastern states, and the bulk of the study sites were located in the West, particularly in Oregon (Fig. 4). Two eastern Forest Service regions contributed 23 study sites and 5 sites were in Alaska. The total number of points from which they received data, pooled across all three years, was 525.
 
 
         
    
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