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Name of Collaboratory :

 

Census of Marine Life

 
 

URL :

  http://www.comlsecretariat.org/  
 

Collaboratory Status :

 
Completed   Start Date : 2000 End Date : 2010 Info Last Updated : Thu, Dec 1 2011 4:01pm PST
 
 

Primary Collaboratory Function :

  Community Data Systems  
 

Secondary Collaboratory Functions :

  Distributed Research Center  
 

Domain(s) :

  EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND OCEAN SCIENCES >Oceanography >Oceanography, EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND OCEAN SCIENCES >Oceanography >Marine Sciences  
 

Brief Description of the Collaboratory :

 

The Census of Marine Life is a global network of researchers in more than 80 nations engaged in a 10-year scientific initiative to assess and explain the diversity, distribution, and abundance of life in the oceans. The world’s first comprehensive census of the past, present, and future of life in the oceans was released in October 2010.

Through 2010, scientists worldwide organized what is known and unknown about life in the oceans and broadened our knowledge of the unknown through new research. Three large questions defined the tasks of the Census: What did live in the oceans? What does live in the oceans? What will live in the oceans? Globally, scientists that collaborated in Census mined historical and environmental archives, typically since about the year 1500, to write a History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), quantifying how fishing and environmental fluctuations changed what lived in the oceans. Fourteen cooperative international Ocean Realm Field Projects as well as affiliated national efforts explored the diversity, distribution, and abundance of what lives in six ocean realms from tidal zones to deep trenches.T he observers in the field projects, as well as HMAP, deposited their data in the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), a global georeferenced database about marine species, accessible on the web with tools for visualizing relations among species and environments. The Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP) network integrated the extensive Census-generated data in mathematical models to predict how environmental and human influences will change what will live in the oceans.

The Census leaves legacies beyond 2010: (1) new views of life in the oceans; (2) a sustained, dynamic OBIS that serves the needs of a variety of user groups; (3) proven technologies and approaches that can be implemented in monitoring programs and ocean and coastal observation systems; (4) increased public interest in the oceans and marine life and support for ongoing research; (5) “human capital” or networks of marine biodiversity scientists around the world; (6) societal benefits by way of a baseline against which future change can be measured, contributions to other assessments, and application of the information.

 
 

Access to Instruments :

  The Census of Marine Life projects have developed and demonstrated technologies that are available for implementation in emerging observing systems, such as the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS).  
 

Access to Information Resources :

  The observers in the field projects, as well as HMAP, deposited their data in the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), a global georeferenced database about marine species, accessible on the web with tools for visualizing relations among species and environments. The Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP) network integrated the extensive Census-generated data in mathematical models to predict how environmental and human influences will change what will live in the oceans.  
 

Access to People as Resources :

   
 

Funding Agency or Sponsor :

 
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
 
 
 

Notes on Funding Agencies/Sponsors:
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is the founding sponsor. There are also hundreds of other programs, organizations, government agencies, and foundations that contributed along the way.

 
 
 
TOTAL PARTICIPANTS:
 

Notes on Participants/Organizations:
The research elements of the CoML are designed to assess and explain the diversity, distribution and abundance or organisms throughout the world’s oceans. The projects will provide data, information and methodology useful for enhancing our understanding of marine biodiversity, both historically and today, as well as a basis for predictions of biological diversity in the future. These elements are centered around the questions:

Oceans Past: What did live in the oceans?
The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP) (another collaboratory): the historical component of the CoML

Oceans Present: What lives in the oceans now?
Ocean Realm Field Projects: to demonstrate the use of novel techniques or technologies that can be applied to future studies. Other collaboratories in this category are:
*Natural Geography in Shore Areas (NaGISA)
*CReefs
*Gulf of Maine Area program (GoMA)
*Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Project (POST)
*Continental Margin Ecosystems on a Worldwide Scale (COMARGE)
*Census of Diversity of Abyssal Marine Life (CeDAMar)
*Census of Marine Zooplankton (CMarZ)
*Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP)
*Patterns and Processes of Ecosystems In the Northern Mid-Atlantic (MAR-ECO)
*Biogeography of Chemosynthetic Ecosystems (ChEss)
*Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam)
*Arctic Ocean Diversity (ArcOD)
*Census of Antarctic Marine Life (CAML)
*International Census of Marine Microbes (ICoMM)

Oceans Future: What will live in the oceans?
The Future of Marine Animal Populations (FMAP) (another collaboratory): the modeling component of the CoML

Synthesis
CoML’s Synthesis will bring together all of the information learned over the course of the program into a series of publications, videos and other communications products.

Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), which is the information component of the CoML, is another collaboraoty.

Scientific Comittee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) Panel on New Technologies for Observing Marine Life, another collaboratory, advises CoML projects on technologies, with partial goal of moving recent technological advances into the field

Affiliated Collaboratories:
*World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS)
*Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)
*Marine Barcode of Life (MarBOL)
*Arafura and Timor Seas Experts Forum (ATSEEF)
*Australia Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Center (ACECRC)
*Implementation and networking of large scale, long term MARine BIOdiversity research in Europe (BIOMARE)
*Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Experience (COSEE)
*Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System (CeNCOOS)
*Centre for Marine Biodiversity (CMB)
*Reference Center on Environmental Information (CRIA)
*Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP)
*Consortium for Ocean Leadership
*Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze del Mare (CoNISMa)
*Consequences of weather and climate changes for
marine and freshwater ecosystems (CONWOY)
*CRC Reef Research Centre
*DIVERSITAS
*European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy (EDIT)
*European Federation of Marine Science and Technology Societies (EFMS)
*European Network of Excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis (EurOceans)
*European Platform for Biodiversity Research Strategy (EPBRS)
*European Science Foundation (ESF)
*European Sea Floor Observatory Network (ESONET)
*Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ)
*Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC)
*Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)
*Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS)
*Northeast Coastal and Ocean Data Partnership (NeCODP)
*Gulf of Maine Marine Education Association (GOMMEA)
*Hawaii Coral Reef Research Initiative Research Program (HCRI-RP)
*Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas (HERMES)
*Hotspot Ecosystem Research and Man’s Impact On European Seas (HERMIONE)
*Integrating Multiple Demands on Coastal Zones with Emphasis on Fisheries and Aquatic Ecosystems (INCOFISH)
*Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network (IABIN)
*International Polar Year (IPY)
*Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)
*Marbena
*Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI)
*Mediterranean Science Commission (CIESM)
*MOnitoring deep sea floor hydrothermal environments on the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MOMARnet)
*National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII)
*National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
*National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR)
*NatureServe
*New England Ocean Sciences Education Collaborative (NEOSEC)
*North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES)
* Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS)
*Ocean Tracking Network (OTN)
*Oceanic Seamounts Integrated Study (OASIS)
*Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO)
*Seamount Biogeosciences Network (SBN)
*SeaweedAfrica
*Scientific and Environmental Rov Partnership using Existing Industrial Technology (SERPENT)
*South African Environmental Observation Network (SAEON)
*Strategic International Research Cooperative Program
*Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS)
*Taxonomic Databases Working Group (TDWG)
*Techno-Ocean Network (TON)
*TreeBASE
*Universal Biological Indexer and Organizer (uBio)
*Moorea Biocode Project
*World Whaling History Project
*Worldwide Universities Network (WUN)

   
     
 
 

Communications Technology Used :

   
 

Technical Capabilities :

   
  Key Articles :    
 

Project-reported performance data :

   
 
         
    
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