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Science of Collaboratories

Dan Atkins
Fran Berman
Rita Colwell
George Djorgovski
Greg Farber
Tom Finholt
Ian Foster
Peter Freeman
Jim French
Dave Fulker
Philippe Galvez
Irene Greif
Jonathan Grudin
Esin Gulari
Ed Hackett
James Hendler
Suzi Iacono
Rich Keller
Tim Killeen
Spyros Konidaris
Rick Luce
Mike Marron
Roberta Miller
Reagan Moore
Jim Myers
Priscilla Nelson
Gary Olson
Judy Olson
Michael Pazzani
Dan Reed
Mary Anne Scott
Wes Shrum
Larry Smarr
John Trimble
Doug van Houweling
John Walsh

Dan Atkins

Daniel E. Atkins is a professor in the School of Information, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and director of the Alliance for Community Technology, a project of the School of Information. Atkins became founding dean of the new School of Information in July 1992, a position which he held until September 1998. With major support of the University and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Atkins led the School of Information to provide international leadership in creating graduate research and educational programs to produce leaders and change agents in the design, use, and evaluation of new knowledge work environments. The view is from a sociotechnical, multidisciplinary perspective. Current research projects at the School of Information are intrinsically both collaborative and multidisciplinary.

Since the mid 1980s, Atkins has provided research leadership in the use of distributed computing/ communication to support distributed forms of team-based knowledge work. He was the principal investigator of the NSF EXPRES project which focused on experimental research to create tools to support remote collaborative multimedia authoring. He served on the NSF panel to define the "collaboratory" and is currently project director of the NSF Space Physics and Aeronomy Research Collaboratory. He also directed the NSF/DARPA/NASA University of Michigan Digital Library project. He recently led a workshop to help define the future digital library research. He is a founding member of the Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work. His research interests are advanced information and collaborative systems and services; and digital library architecture.
http://intel.si.umich.edu/cfdocs/si/courses/people//faculty-detail.cfm?passID=2
http://www.communitytechnology.org/partners.html

Fran Berman

Francine Berman is Director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center , the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (NPACI) , Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at U. C. San Diego, Fellow of the ACM, and Director of the Grid Computing Laboratory at UCSD. Her research interests over the last two decades have focused on parallel and distributed computation, and in particular the areas of programming environments, tools, and models that support high-performance computing.

Dr. Berman's current research focuses on the development of performance-oriented software, models and applications for networked heterogeneous distributed resources, also known as Computational Grids or Metasystems. The Grid Computing Laboratory, under Dr. Berman's direction, collaborates widely and is developing leading-edge adaptive heuristics, models, middleware and other software for distributed high-performance and computational science applications and environments. Dr. Berman currently leads a team of researchers in the development of steerable software Virtual Instruments targeted towards the implementation of large-scale adaptive distributed parameter sweep simulations. She also co-leads the AppLeS project with Rich Wolski, focused on the development of dynamic application scheduling methods and performance technology for multi-user distributed environments. Dr. Berman has served on numerous boards, program and conference committees providing expertise in the areas of parallel computing and Grid Computing.
http://www.cs.ucsd.edu/users/berman/

Rita Colwell

Dr. Rita R. Colwell, a nationally respected scientist and educator, became the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation in 1998. Since taking office, she has spearheaded the agency's emphases in K-12 science and mathematics education, graduate science and engineering education/training and the increased participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. Her policy approach has enabled the agency to strengthen its core activities, as well as establish support for major initiatives, including Nanotechnology, Biocomplexity, Information Technology, Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences and the 21st Century Workforce. In her capacity as NSF Director, she serves as Co-chair of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council.

Before coming to NSF, Dr. Colwell was President of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 1991-1998, and she remains Professor of Microbiology and Biotechnology (on leave) at the University Maryland. In addition, Colwell has held many advisory positions in the U.S. Government, non-profit science policy organizations, and private foundations, as well as in the international scientific research community. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Medal of Distinction from Columbia University, the Gold Medal of Charles University, Prague, and the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Alumna Summa Laude Dignata from the University of Washington, Seattle.
http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/forum/colwell/rrcbio.htm

George Djorgovski

S. George Djorgovski is a Professor of Astronomy at Caltech. His main scientific interests are in the areas of cosmology and extragalactic astronomy, including formation and early evolution of galaxies, quasars, and large-scale structure, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, fundamental properties of galaxies and other stellar systems, etc. He is the Principal Investigator of the Digital Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, and was one of the founders of the Virtual Observatory concept. He was the chairman of the National Virtual Observatory Science Definition team. His recent interests are in the scientific exploration of massive and complex data sets in astronomy, including new domains of the observable parameter space. Prof. Djorgovski was also involved in the development of the Keck 10-m telescopes, and now in the proposed California 30-m telescope. He served on numerous professional and advisory bodies, but would rather do science instead.
http://www.astro.caltech.edu/~george/

Greg Farber

Dr. Farber is a health scientist administrator in the Division of Biomedical Technology at the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) at NIH. He manages large instrument development centers in the areas of NMR spectroscopy, optics, and computations. Many of these centers were involved in the first round of collaboratory funding from NCRR, and Dr. Farber is managing both the first round of NCRR collaboratories as well as planning for the next round. He is also in charge of an instrument development program aimed at individual investigators covering all techniques that can be applied to biomedical research.

Prior to moving to NIH, Dr. Farber spent a year as a rotator in the Division of Biological Infrastructure at NSF, and before that he was a professor at Penn State working in the areas of protein crystallography, enzymology, and molecular evolution. He has published over 40 papers in these areas. Dr. Farber received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry at MIT in 1988 and spent the following year as a Life Science Research Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Wisconsin working on enzyme kinetics before moving to Penn State. While on the faculty at Penn State, he was named a Searle Scholar. His research at Penn State was supported by NIH, NSF, ONR, and the Department of Agriculture.

Tom Finholt

Thomas Finholt is director of the Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work, senior associate research scientist, and adjunct assistant professor of psychology. As director of the Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work, Finholt researches how collaboratory systems affect users. He is also active in the Space Physics and Aeronomy Research Collaboratory, in which he conducts basic research on the impact of SPARC itself on its user community. His research focuses on the impact of computer communication technology on information processing in organizations; distance learning; and the design of collaborative computing environments.
http://www.crew.umich.edu/Investigators/tfinholt.htm
http://intel.si.umich.edu/cfdocs/si/courses/people//faculty-detail.cfm?passID=37

Ian Foster

I hold a joint appointment in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago and in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. My research projects at the university are conducted in the context of the Distributed Systems Laboratory.

In my research, I seek to develop tools and techniques that allow people to use high-performance computing technologies to do qualitatively new things. This involves investigations of parallel and distributed languages, algorithms, and communication; and also focused work on applications. I am particularly interested in using high-performance networking to incorporate remote compute and information resources into local computational environments.
http://www-fp.mcs.anl.gov/~foster/

Peter Freeman

Peter A. Freeman became Assistant Director for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate (CISE) on May 6, 2002.

Dr. Freeman was previously at Georgia Institute of Technology as professor and founding Dean of the College of Computing since 1990. He served in that capacity as the John P. Imlay, Jr. Dean of Computing, holding the first endowed Dean's Chair at Georgia Tech. He was in charge of the FutureNet Project, part of the campus technology preparations for the 1996 Olympic Village, that resulted in a very high-performance and broad campus network. In 1998, he chaired the Sam Nunn NationsBank Policy Forum on Information Security which lead to the creation of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center, one of the first comprehensive centers in the country focused on information security.

During 1989-90 Dr. Freeman was Visiting Distinguished Professor of Information Technology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, and from 1987 to 1989 he served as Division Director for Computer and Computation Research at the National Science Foundation. He served on the faculty of the Department of Information and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine, for almost twenty years before coming to Georgia Tech.

Dr. Freeman was a member of the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association (1988-2002), serving as Vice-Chair and Chair of the Government Affairs Committee. He was a member of select review committees of the IRS and FAA Air-traffic Control modernization efforts, and has served on a variety of national and regional committees. While at NSF, he helped formulate the High-Performance Computing and Communications Initiative of the Federal government.

Dr. Freeman is a Fellow of the IEEE (Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers), AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), and the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1970, his M.A. in mathematics and psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1965, and his B.S. in physics from Rice University in 1963. His research and technical expertise has focused on software systems and their creation. His earliest work (1961-63) involved developing advanced scientific applications in the days before there were operating systems and other support software. This led him to design and build one of the earliest interactive time-sharing operating systems (1964) and ultimately to early work applying artificial intelligence to the design process for software (1965-75). This culminated with the publication of his first book, Software System Principles (SRA, 1975).

After a short stint teaching overseas for the United Nations, he focused his work on software engineering, ultimately being recognized for this early work by being elected a Fellow of the IEEE. Along with Prof. A. I. Wasserman, he developed one of the first software design courses (taken by thousands of industry practitioners) and published a highly popular text that served as a first introduction to software engineering. His research during this period focused on reusable software, especially using formal transformation systems. That work has resulted in several startup companies.

Jim French

James French is the Program Director of the Information Infrastructure Program in the Division of Information and Intelligent Systems at the National Science Foundataion. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science, at the University of Virginia in 1982. After several years in industry, he returned to the University of Virginia in 1987 as Senior Scientist in the Institute for Parallel Computation and became a research assistant professor of Computer Science in 1990. He is currently directing three Ph.D. theses. He is the editor of five books, and the author or co-author of one book and over 65 papers and book chapters.

Jim French's chief research interests are in the areas of distributed information retrieval and digital libraries. In the area of digital library technology, Professor French is currently collaborating with researchers at several other universities on the development and deployment of NCSTRL, the Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library. Professor French is directing a DARPA sponsored project on Personalized Information Environments (PIE) which are user-centric information seeking environments that can be widely deployed over the Internet to provide customized search and current awareness services. Professor French is also directing a NASA sponsored project (EVOC) that is investigating novel search strategies to facilitate finding Earth science data
http://www.cise.nsf.gov/staff?name=jfrench
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/brochure/profs/french.html

Dave Fulker

Dave Fulker directs the National Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology Education Digital Library (NSDL) and the Unidata program at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. Though his responsibilities are primarily managerial, Dave's current interests encompass digital libraries and software designs for managing, sharing, and visualizing scientific data. He also is engaged in utilizing technology to foster and sustain virtual academic communities. His 15-year tenure with Unidata has helped transform the ways universities acquire and use meteorological data for education and research. His current role in NSDL began in 2001 when the multi-institution team he leads won the NSF grant for "Core Integration" of the library, which will comprise heterogeneous components constructed by widely distributed developers.

Dave's affiliation with UCAR began in 1966 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). There he engaged in software design and development, including fast Fourier transforms, spline-based multivariate function approximation, turbulence simulation, and the analysis of output from atmospheric models. He also helped to establish the first remote access to NCAR supercomputers using TCP/IP-based networks.
http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/dave/

Philippe Galvez

Philippe Galvez is a Senior Network Engineer, who has worked for the California Institute of Technology since 1995. He is one of the partners responsible for the management of the high speed transatlantic network in support of high energy physics research. He is the principal developer and architect of the international web-based videoconferencing system known as VRVS (Virtual Room Videoconferencing Service; see http://www.vrvs.org) which allows several thousand scientists worldwide to collaborate. This system is currently running in more than 60 countries and has become a standard part of the toolset used daily by a large sector of HENP, and is used increasingly by other DoE/NSF-supported programs.

Current activities include the implementation in VRVS of new digital video technologies, including H.323 I.T.U. standard integration, MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 videoconferencing integration, shared collaborative environments, security, and Quality of Service.

Irene Greif

Irene Greif heads the Collaborative User Experience Group (CUE), a team of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) researchers located in Cambridge, MA. The group has historically worked most closely with Lotus product teams on collaboration software. Irene also directs the Lotus Product Design Group (PDG) at Lotus and has developed a strategic design practice that spans both CUE and PDG.

Irene is a former faculty member of Computer Science at University of Washington and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She headed a research group in the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science which developed shared calendar, coauthoring, and real-time collaboration systems. She is a fellow of both the Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM.) Irene was inducted into the Women In Technology International (WITI) Hall of Fame in 2000. Irene received her S.B. in Mathematics, her S.M. and her PhD. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT.

Irene joined Lotus in 1987 and formed Lotus Research in 1992. Product innovations from her group include Version Manager for 1-2-3, InterNotes Web Publisher (precursor to Domino); the first Palm Pilot conduit for Notes mail; the Sametime strategy for integrating awareness, conversation, and shared objects; and most recently, the design vision for Reinventing Email. Irene is an IBM Fellow.

Jonathan Grudin

I work in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group at Microsoft Research, part of the Microsoft Corporation. My research is in human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work, with a particular focus on the design, adoption and use of group support technologies. Much of the work below was done in the Collaborative and Multimedia Systems Group.

Prior to joining Microsoft Research, I was Professor of Information and Computer Science at University of California, Irvine. I have taught at Aarhus University, Keio University, and the University of Oslo, and worked at the MRC Applied Psychology Unit, Wang Laboratories, and MCC since earning my Ph.D. at UC San Diego.
http://research.microsoft.com/~jgrudin/

Esin Gulari

On September 5, 2001, Wayne State University Professor Esin Gulari was appointed Acting Assistant Director at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in charge of Engineering. A professor of chemical engineering, Gulari has been at NSF for the past 12 months serving as Division Director of the Chemical and Transport Systems Division.

Gulari earned her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Caltech in Pasadena, California, in 1973, and joined the WSU College of Engineering faculty in 1979. She was chair of the WSU Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Department from 1993 to 2000. In 1995, she was awarded the Henry Ford Technology Award for her work in controlling oil mist in machining operations, an important innovation for environmental conditions in automotive plants.

She is an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, second vice chair for the Council of Chemical Research, a member of the NRC Chemical Sciences Roundtable, and a member of the executive board of the Committee for the Advancement of Women Chemists and Chemical Engineers (COACh). Gulari is also the recipient of many honors and awards, including the Wayne State Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award (1996) and the Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award (1999).

Ed Hackett

My research mainly concerns the social organization and social consequences of science and technology. I am currently engaged in two projects. The first, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, is a longitudinal study of the organization and dynamics of research groups in science and engineering. The study is concerned with how groups grow and change over time, what factors influence performance, and how changes in the resource and research environments influence group dynamics. The second study is concerned with the social distribution of environmental hazards, and how such hazards and the associated scientific principles are understood by ordinary people.
http://www.asu.edu/clas/sociology/faculty/hackett.html

James Hendler

Jim Hendler is a Professor at the University of Maryland and the Director of Semantic Web and Agent Technology at the Maryland Information and Network Dynamics Laboratory. He has joint appointments in the Department of Computer Science, the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and the Institute for Systems Research, and he is also an affiliate of the Electrical Engineering Department. He has authored close to 150 technical papers in the areas of artificial intelligence, robotics, agent-based computing and high performance processing. Hendler was the recipient of a 1995 Fulbright Foundation Fellowship, is a member of the US Air Force Science Advisory Board, and is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. He is also the former Chief Scientist of the Information Systems Office at the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and is a prominent player in the World Wide Web Consortium's Semantic Web Activity.
http://www.cs.umd.edu/~hendler/

Suzi Iacono

Suzi Iacono is Program Director of the Digital Society and Technologies Program in the Information and Intelligent Systems Division of the Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation. She serves as the chair of the Interagency Social, Economic and Workforce (SEW) Implications of Information Technology and Information Technology Workforce Development Coordinating Group, which gives policy, program and budget guidance on federal SEW IT R & D. Previously, she held a faculty position at Boston University and was a Visiting Scholar at the Sloan School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has written many journal articles, book chapters and conference papers on the social implications of IT. Recent examples include "Best Paper" in the Telemedicine Journal for 1999 and invited commentary in 2001 on the state of IT research in Information Systems Research journal. Suzi received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in Information Systems and her M.A. and B.A. from the University of California, Irvine in Social Ecology. She is Associate Editor for The Information Society and Management Information Systems Quarterly.

Rich Keller

Dr. Keller is currently a senior computer scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. He serves as technical lead for the Information Sharing and Integration Group within the Collaborative and Assistant Systems technical area of the Computational Sciences Division. Keller has worked at NASA for over ten years, specializing in the design and development of intelligent software tools to support scientific work, including tools for scientific modeling-building, information access, and collaborative remote science.

Dr. Keller is currently involved in two main projects: the ScienceDesk project developing specialized tools and infrastructure to support collaboration among distributed scientific teams; and the Aviation Data Integration Project (ADIP) developing new techniques for fusing data from multiple sources to assist in safety-related assessment of aircraft operations. From 1989-1995, he led the SIGMA project aimed at developing AI techniques to support scientific modeling. He also participated in development of the WebTagger system, a tool for indexing and organizing Web links (i.e., "bookmarks" or "favorites").

Prior to his current position, Dr. Keller served as a research associate at Stanford University's Knowledge Systems Laboratory, where he headed up a project investigating the application of knowledge-sharing and knowledge compilation techniques to engineering device modeling. He received an A.B. in mathematics from Cornell University, an M.S. in computer science from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in computer science from Rutgers University in 1987. Dr. Keller's thesis research focused on the development of analytical machine learning techniques. Dr. Keller has been the recipient of awards for the best conference papers in the area of machine learning and knowledge-based software engineering. His current research interests include collaborative environments, computer-supported cooperative
work, digital libraries, semantic web, knowledge management technology, and information integration.
http://ic.arc.nasa.gov/people/keller/

Tim Killeen

Tim Killeen was recently selected the new director of NCAR. He joins NCAR after more than 20 years at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM), where he has been a leader on several research and education fronts. A native of Cardiff, Wales, Killeen earned a bachelor's degree in physics and, in 1975, a doctorate in atomic and molecular physics, both from University College, London. At Michigan, he was a professor in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences Department and served as associate vice- president for research. Also at UM, Killeen lead a group of 15 scientists and engineers who are using a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the upper atmospheres of earth and other planets. He has been honored with both the Excellence in Teaching and the Excellence in Research awards from UM, along with two NASA achievement awards. Kileen also lead the UM Aeronomical Observatory Program, which includes five remotely operated optical observatories from Chile to the Arctic's Resolute Bay.
http://www.ncar.ucar.edu/Director/Director.html

Spyros Konidaris

Spyros Konidaris is the Advisor to the Deputy Director General of the European Commission DG Information Society. Dr. Konidaris is a Distinguished European Union Fellow at the Graduate School for Political and International Affairs and Centre of Western European Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a Research Fellow/Visiting Professor International Telecoms Union-I.T.U. at the Institute of Telecoms Sciences at Bolder, CO. and Optical Sciences Centre in Arizona. He received his PhD and Master of Technology from Brunel University, London UK., and his BSc. in Physics from Athens University.

Rick Luce

Rick Luce is the Research Library Director at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Project Leader of the Library Without Walls. Known as both an information technology pioneer and organizational innovator, he has held numerous advisory and consultative positions supporting digital library development and digital publishing. In 1999 he co-founded the Open Archives Initiative with Herbert Van de Sompel and Paul Ginsparg. Currently, he is the Senior Advisor to the Center for Information Management at the Max Planck Society, an Executive Board member of NISO and the University of California's Digital Media Innovations Program, and Course Director of TICER's International Spring School on the Digital Library and E-Publishing for Science and Technology in Geneva. Prior to his appointment at Los Alamos in 1991, he held positions as Executive Director of the Southeast Florida Library Information Network (SEFLIN), Director of Colorado's Irving Library Network, and Assistant Director of the Boulder Public Library. Rick speaks extensively in the areas of digital libraries and scientific communication, quality and change management, and strategic planning.

Mike Marron

Dr. Michael Marron earned a Ph. D. Degree in Chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in 1968 and conducted post-doctoral research at the Theoretical Chemistry Institute in Madison, Wisconsin. In 1970, he began an academic career at the University of Wisconsin where he served as a professor of chemistry, department chairman, and Dean of Science at the Parkside Campus. During this time, Dr. Marron taught physical and biophysical chemistry, conducted research on fundamental mechanisms of interaction between extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and living organisms, and helped found the Biomedical Research Institute to foster interdisciplinary research. In 1983, Dr. Marron joined the Office of Naval Research (ONR) to become Program Manager in Molecular Biology where he managed multidisciplinary extramural research programs related to marine biology, biosensors, biomaterials, nanotechnology, and environmental biology. He also developed and managed a program in laser medicine for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. During his tenure at the ONR, he served as Chief Scientist for Biological Sciences, Director of Resources and Assessment for the Chief of Naval Operations, and DoD biotechnology representative on national and international committees. Since November of 1999, Dr. Marron has been the Associate Director of Biomedical Technology for the National Center for Research Resources.

Roberta Miller

Roberta Balstad Miller is Senior Research Scientist at Columbia University and Director of the University's Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Dr. Miller has published extensively on science policy, information technology and scientific research, and the role of the social sciences in understanding global environmental change. She is the author of numerous articles and books, including City and Hinterland: A Case Study of Urban Growth and Regional Development (1979) and editor, with Harriet Zuckerman, of Science Indicators: Implications for Research and Policy (1980). Her publications have been translated into French, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish. As chair of the National Research Council's Steering Committee on Space Applications and Commercialization, Dr. Miller has just completed two book-length reports to be published by National Academies Press, one is focused on public-private partnerships in remote sensing and the second on the use of remote sensing by state, local, and regional governments.

Dr. Miller received the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in History in 1974. She was appointed senior fellow at Oxford University in 1991-1992 and a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 1994. She was previously the Director of the Division of Social and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation, the founder and first Executive Director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA), and President/CEO of CIESIN prior to its joining Columbia University. She has lectured widely, both in the United States and abroad. From 1992 to 1994, she was Vice President of the International Social Science Council and has also served as chair of the NATO Advisory Panel on Advanced Scientific Workshops/Advanced Research Institutes, the AAAS Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy, and the Advisory Committee of the Luxembourg Income Study. She currently serves on the Advisory Board of the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Studies (South Africa) and the US National Committee for the International Institute for Advanced Systems Analysis (Austria), and she chairs St. Antony's College Trust (Oxford University) in North America. She has published translations of the poetry of Jorge Luis Borges (Spanish) and N.P. van Wyck Louw (Afrikaans).

Reagan Moore

Reagan Moore is Associate Director for Data Intensive Computing at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and an Adjunct Professor in the UCSD CSE department. He coordinates research efforts in development of massive data analysis systems, scientific data publication systems, and persistent archives. An ongoing research interest is support for information based data-intensive computing. Moore is an active participant in NSF workshops on digital libraries and Knowledge Networks. Recent publications include a chapter on data-intensive computing in the book "The Grid: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure". Moore has been at SDSC since its inception, initially being responsible for operating system development. Prior to that he worked as a computational plasma physicist at General Atomics on equilibrium and stability of toroidal fusion devices. He has a Ph.D. in plasma physics from the University of California, San Diego, (1978) and a B.S. in physics from the California Institute of Technology (1967).
http://www.sdsc.edu/~moore/rmoore.html

Jim Myers

Dr. James D. Myers is a Senior Research Scientist leading the Collaboratory Development Group in the Computing and Information Sciences Department. He is a Principal Investigator on a Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Collaborative Experiment Environment (DCEE) project and several internally funded projects to design, develop, deploy, and understand the use of the EMSL Collaboratory Software Environment and it's integrated collaborative work tools.

Dr. Myers joined the EMSL in 1993 to develop data acquisition, analysis, and visualization software for experimental chemistry projects. Soon after, he helped start research on an Environmental Molecular Sciences Collaboratory and is now leading the EMSL Collaboratory development efforts. Dr. Myers is a Principal Investigator on a Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Collaborative Experiment Environment (DCEE) project and several internally funded projects to design, develop, deploy, and understand the use of the EMSL Collaborative Research Environment (CORE) and it's integrated collaborative work tools. He has experience in object-oriented software design, distributed computing, network and World Wide Web (WWW) communications, collaborative/groupware systems, and hardware interfacing, and is one of the designer/developers of the EMSL CORE software, including the EMSL Televiewer prototype, WebTour facility, and collaborative session management facilities.
http://emslbios.pnl.gov/id/myers_jd

Priscilla Nelson

Dr. Priscilla Nelson is Director of the Civil and Mechanical Systems (CMS) Division in the Directorate for Engineering at the National Science Foundation (NSF). She has been at NSF since 1994, and has served as Program Director for the Geotechnical Engineering program, and as Program Manager for the NEES (Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation) project that represents an $82 million federal investment in cyberinfrastructure and earthquake experimentation equipment to be completed between FY2000 and FY2004.

Dr. Nelson was formerly Professor of Civil Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. She has received three earned advanced degrees including Master's degrees in both Geology (Indiana University) and Structural Engineering (University of Oklahoma). In 1983, she received her PhD from Cornell University in Geotechnical Engineering. Dr. Nelson has a national and international reputation in geological and rock engineering, and the particular application of underground construction. She has more than 15 years of teaching experience and more than 120 technical and scientific publications to her credit.

Dr. Nelson is Past-President of the Geo-Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a lifetime member and first President of the American Rock Mechanics Association. Among many other professional affiliations, she is a member of the American Underground-Construction Association, the Association of Engineering Geologists, the International Tunnelling Association, and the American Society for Engineering Education. She has served as a member of several National Research Council boards and committees. Dr. Nelson has been a part of several major construction projects, including field engineering responsibilities during construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, and serving as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Texas for the Superconducting Super Collider project. She is a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, appointed by President Clinton in 1997 and reappointed in 2000.

Gary Olson

Gary M. Olson is Paul M. Fitts Professor of Human-Computer Interaction and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Information and Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. He received his B.A. (1967) in Psychology from the University of Minnesota, and an M.A. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) in Psychology from Stanford University. He served on active duty as a Lieutenant in the Medical Service Corps of the U.S. Naval Reserve from 1970 to 1973, working as an Experimental Psychologist at the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory in Groton, Connecticut. In 1973 he joined the faculty of Michigan State University as an Assistant Professor of Psychology. He moved to The University of Michigan in 1975, where he has been since. During 1989-90 he was on sabbatical leave in Cambridge, England, and in 1998 was on sabbatical leave in both Palo Alto, California and London, England. Since 1993 he has been Professor of Psychology at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing. In 1996 he became a charter faculty member of the new School of Information at the University of Michigan, where he has also served as Associate Dean for Research. He served as Interim Dean of the School from September of 1998 to December 1999.

For the past decade-and-a-half he has conducted research in the areas of human-computer interaction (HCI) and computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). Of late much of the focus of his work has been on how to support small groups of people working on difficult intellectual tasks, particularly when the members of the group are geographically distributed. This research has involved both field studies of groups attempting to do such work and lab studies that evaluate specific technologies. His research is currently supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Russell Sage Foundation, the John Evans Foundation, the Pritzker Foundation, and the Ameritech Foundation. He has published nearly a hundred articles and chapters, and has edited three books. He served as Director of the Cognitive Science and Machine Intelligence Laboratory from 1986 to 1994, and as Director of the Collaboratory for Research on Electronic work from 1994 to 1997.

Professor Olson has served on behalf of a wide range of national and international organizations. He has chaired a several international conferences, including the Cognitive Science Society annual meeting (twice), the Design of Interactive Systems (DIS) meetings (twice), and the Empirical Studies of Programmers meeting. He has served as technical program chair for both CHI '91 and CSCW '96, and has chaired a number of other specific activities for both CHI and CSCW. He has served on numerous NSF review panels and advisory groups, including hosting four grantee conferences for the Coordination Theory and Collaboration Technology initiative. He serves on five editorial boards, and does extensive ad hoc reviewing.

At the University of Michigan he has been an active participant in both the Department of Psychology and the School of Information, serving on numerous committees. He has also been on a number of University-wide committees, particularly in the area of information technology.
http://intel.si.umich.edu/cfdocs/si/courses/people/faculty-detail.cfm?passID=77
http://www.crew.umich.edu/Investigators/golson.htm

Judy Olson

Judith S. Olson is the Richard W. Pew Chair in Human Computer Interaction, Professor at the School of Information, Professor in the Computer and Information Systems Department at the Business School, and Professor at the Department of Psychology .

Judy's current research focuses on the nature of group work and the design and evaluation of technology to support it. This field combines cognitive and social psychology with the design of information systems. She began her career at Michigan in the Department of Psychology, served as a Technical Supervisor for human factors in systems engineering at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, and returned to Michigan to the Business School and then the new School of Information. She has over 60 publications in journals and books, and has served on a number of national committees, including the National Research Council Committee on Human Factors and the Council of the Association for Computing Machinery. She has recently been appointed to the CHI Academy.
http://www.crew.umich.edu/Investigators/jolson.htm
http://www.bus.umich.edu/academic/faculty/jsolson.html

Michael Pazzani

Michael J. Pazzani is the Director of the Information and Intelligent Systems Division of the National Science Foundation. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA and is a full professor at the University of California, Irvine where he also served as department chair of Information and Computer Science at UCI for five years. He has served as CEO of AdaptiveInfo a company involved in personalization solutions for the mobile web. He has published numerous papers in machine learning, personalization, information retrieval, and cognitive science.
http://www.ics.uci.edu/~pazzani/

Dan Reed

My primary research interests are tools and techniques for capturing, analyzing, and optimizing the performance of parallel and metacomputing systems via instrumentation, analysis, and collaborative virtual environments. These techniques support study of resource management for parallel systems, most notably input/output characterization and parallel file systems, domains that are critical to developing high-performance implementations of parallel applications.. Most recently, my group has focused on real-time, adaptive control for resource management and high-modality virtual environments for interactive performance analysis.

Elements of my research are contributing to several national collaborations, including the NSF's Center for Grid Application Development Software (GrADS). GrADS is a multidisciplinary group of computational and computer scientists who are exploring the scientific and technical problems that must be solved to enable the routine development and performance tuning of Grid applications. I am also a contributor to the Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Internet Initiative, a collaboration aimed at catalyzing the development of both network-aware middleware and sophisticated, network-aware applications by exploring uniform detection, notification, and adaptation mechanisms that can be applied across the layers of technology supporting distributed applications.

I also participate in several collaborations undertaken through the DOE Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative. I am a member of the science steering committee of the DOE Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets (CSAR). I am also a member of the new Los Alamos Computer Science Institute, a collaboration involving the Los Alamos Advanced Computing Laboratory, Rice University, the University of Houston, and my research group. The goal of this collaboration is to develop new software tools and compilation techniques for massively parallel systems and for distributed computational grids.

In addition to heading the Pablo research group, I serve as director of the National Computational Science Alliance (Alliance), one of two National Science Foundation Partnerships for an Advanced Computational Infrastructure (PACI). In this capacity, I am the principal investigator for the Alliance cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation, assuming overall responsibility for the Alliance and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) in its role as the leading edge site for the Alliance.

Finally, I am head of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
http://www-pablo.cs.uiuc.edu/People/Reed/DanReed.htm

Mary Anne Scott

Dr. Mary Anne Scott is a program manager in the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. For the past seven years she has managed a program of research and development for collaboration technologies that scientists and engineers need to access remote resources and facilities and to collaborate effectively as members of multi-disciplinary distributed teams. Over that time the program has evolved into a number of integrated projects largely focused on developing, advancing and deploying grid technologies in an environment where research scientists and engineers can use these emerging capabilities in advancing their domain specific science applications. She also managed an effort for developing advanced tools that make it easier for programmers to write high performance applications, largely focused on the interoperability of large libraries-the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) toolkit. The current National Collaboratory program combines a number of infrastructure and middleware projects with real world pilots to test and validate the technology being developed. Details can be found at http://doecollaboratory.pnl.gov/.

Prior to joining MICS in 1994, she was a program manager in the Fusion Energy Sciences Office with responsibility for managing computing resources for that community and for organizing an effort to focus improving the implementation through appropriate planning of resources based on needs and opportunities for that community.

From 1976 to 1986, she was employed by the University of Tennessee Space Institute, first as a research scientist then moving to a managerial position within a research project focused on open-cycle magnetohydrodynamics. She was responsible for the group designing, building and operating the upstream power train components within the Coal-Fired Flow Facility that was operated by that research program. She also held an adjunct faculty appointment in Electrical Engineering..

Dr. Scott received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the Tennessee Technological University in 1965 and a Master of Science from the University of Tennessee in 1970. She received a Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Science from the University of Tennessee in 1976.

Wes Shrum

Wesley Shrum has been a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at Louisiana State University since 1982. He has been the Secretary of the Society for Social Studies of Science since 1987. His main interest has been the sociology of science and technology. He has recently completed a manuscript on The Structure of Scientific Collaborations based on a 10 year study of multi-institutional collaborations in high energy physics, space science, geophysics, astronomy, and allied disciplines. Since the early 1990s he has been engaged in a field study in Kenya, Ghana, and India. This study first examined scientific communication networks and recently refocused on the role of the Internet in Africa and Asian science. He also studies ritual disrobement at Mardi Gras.
http://www.lsu.edu/sociology/faculty/shrum.html

Larry Smarr

Dr. Smarr is a pioneer in prototyping a national information infrastructure to support academic research, governmental functions, and industrial competitiveness. In 1985, Dr. Smarr became the founding Director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). In 1997, he became in addition the founding Director of the National Computational Science Alliance, comprised of over fifty universities, government labs, and corporations linked with NCSA in a national-scale virtual enterprise to prototype the information infrastructure of the 21st Century. Most recently, Dr. Smarr became the founding Director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, which spans the Universities of California at San Diego and Irvine. Dr. Smarr received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and conducted observational, theoretical, and computational based astrophysical sciences research for fifteen years before becoming Director of NCSA. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1990 he received the Franklin Institute's Delmer S. Fahrney Gold Medal for Leadership in Science or Technology. Dr. Smarr is a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee.
http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/~lsmarr/

John Trimble

John Trimble received his BS degree in science engineering from Northwestern University in 1971, and MS in computer science from Stanford in 1973, and MS in operations research from University of California Berkeley in 1980 and his PhD from Georgia Institute of Technology in systems engineering in 1992. Prior to returning to the University to complete his doctorate, John worked in industry as a programmer analyst, project manager and manager of software quality assurance at Hewlett Packard, Xerox, and Amdahl. From 1989-1996 John served as the chairperson of the computer science department at Morris Brown College. In 1996 John joined the faculty at Howard University in the systems and computer science department.

John is currently an associate professor and director of the departments graduate program. His research interest include intelligent systems, knowledge management, system dynamics, knowledge acquisition, and appropriate technology.
http://www.imappl.org/~trimble/trimble.html

Doug van Houweling

Douglas E. Van Houweling is President and CEO of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), the formal organization supporting Internet2. Before being named to the position on October 1, 1997, Van Houweling served as Vice Chair of the Internet2 Steering Committee with responsibility for partner relations.

Dr. Van Houweling has played a major role in Internet development in the United States. He was chairman of the Board of MERIT, Inc., a Michigan statewide computing network, when the National Science Foundation awarded it responsibility for operation and management of the NSFNET national backbone in partnership with IBM, MCI and the Michigan Strategic Fund in 1987. Van Houweling was also chairman of the Board of Advanced Network and Services Corporation, a not-for-profit organization that implemented and operated the world's largest Internet backbone network from 1991 until 1995. In 1995, Advanced Network and Services transferred its operational capability to America Online through a $40M sale and is using the proceeds to support networking for education and research.

Van Houweling has also been active in inter-university initiatives, serving on the EDUCOM Board and playing roles in establishing numerous initiatives to establish cooperative information technology efforts among universities. He was a founder of EDUCOM's Networking and Telecommunications Task Force and the Inter-university Consortium for Educational Computing. Van Houweling is chairman of the Board of the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM), a research and development enterprise serving Michigan and the nation in the fields of remote sensing, environmental analysis, and information technology.

Dr. Van Houweling holds a faculty position at the University of Michigan as Professor in the School of Information. Before undertaking his responsibilities at UCAID, Professor Van Houweling was Dean for Academic Outreach and Vice Provost for Information and Technology at the University of Michigan.
Van Houweling came to Michigan from Carnegie-Mellon University where he was Vice Provost for Computing and Planning from 1981 until 1984. Before joining Carnegie-Mellon, Van Houweling was at Cornell University from 1970 to 1981 as Assistant Professor of Government. In 1976, he took on the additional responsibility of Assistant Director for User Services in Cornell Computer Services. In 1978, he was named Director of Academic Computing and in 1980 became Director of Academic Computing and Central Computing Services.

Dr. Van Houweling received his undergraduate degree from Iowa State University and his Ph.D. in Government from Indiana University. He has consulted with numerous organizations and businesses and has written many articles on information technology, as well as on urban policies and the modeling of political processes.
http://www.internet2.edu/html/d_vanhouweling

John Walsh

I am an Associate Professor of Sociology at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). My Ph.D. is from Northwestern University (1988). My research interests are the study of innovation and the sociology of work and organizations. I am currently involved in two main research projects. The first is a survey of the economics and organization of industrial R&D in the US and Japan (in collaboration with Wesley Cohen, Akira Goto, Akiya Nagata and Richard Nelson). The second is a survey of scientists in four fields (biology, mathematics, physics and sociology) on the relations between the uses of the Internet and scientific collaboration and productivity.
http://tigger.uic.edu/~jwalsh/

 
         
    
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